4 Key Components Of A Roadside Emergency Kit

No one wants to be broken down on the side of the road, but it still happens so it is best to be prepared. Take a few minutes to put together your roadside emergency kit and then check it monthly to make sure it is up to date. The following can help you get a good kit together.

#1: Gather Some Safety Gear

Safety is your main concern when you have an issue. Your kit should include some traffic cones and road flares. Three collapsible cones are the minimum to carry, since these can be set up trailing off the back of your vehicle to notify drivers of your location. Flares work best at night, when cones are not visible.

#2: Add Some Seasonal Gear

In cold climates it is a good idea to have a blanket in the car, or at the very least, a mylar emergency blanket. You may also want to include hand warmers and a dry set of clothing, in case you have to get out of the vehicle in heavy snow. Packaged food with a long shelf life, like energy bars, and water is also a must if you drive outside of major urban areas.

#3: Ensure You Can Get Help

Although you likely have a cell phone, it's still a good idea to have a backup. Keep an old, fully charged phone in your kit. At the very least, you can use it to call 9-1-1. Also, keep a spare car charger for your current phone in the kit. You may still be able to charge it off the battery even if the car won't start. Finally, have a list of emergency numbers. This should include the number for any roadside assistance plan that you have, or the numbers for tow truck companies (like Jenwar Towing & Recovery) that operate in the cities where you normally drive.

#4: Include Some Basic Repair Equipment

A jack, spare tire, and jumper cables are the bare minimum for any kit. While you may not be able to change a tire on your own, a tow driver will still need a spare that is fully aired and in good condition if they are to change your tire. Otherwise, they will need to tow your vehicle to a shop, which will take even more time. Make sure your kit also contains the key to your tire rims lug nuts, if applicable, otherwise the driver won't be able to remove your wheel and tire.

About Me

get yourself out of the snow

With winter weather comes treacherous driving conditions. When you slide off of the road, do you know how to get yourself back out of the ditch and on the road again? Is there anything that you can do to avoid having to call a tow truck? On my blog you will find a list of things that you should keep in your car at all times during the winter and tips for effectively using each item. It is my hope that my years of experience digging cars out of the snow will help you get out safely and only call a tow when absolutely necessary.

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